Simple Ways To Log Homeschool Hours – The “Hub”

In many states, the Cornovirus pandemic has forced families to educate their children at home. Rather your learning style is virtual or written assisgnments, you should start documenting your hours. This information will be hepful if you decide to continue your homeschooling journey. The Missouri Home School law requires that you teach a minimum of 1,000 hours. To be specific, at least 600 of those hours in core subjects, reading, math, social studies, language arts, and science. The other 400 hours can be spent on extra curricular activities or other non core subjects. The school year begins on July 1st and ends on June 31th of the following year. The law requires three basic pieces of information per home schooled child.


A plan book, diary, computer entry log.:


• This is to keep a record of the subject taught, the actual assignment and what day or week the lesson took place.

• A portfolio of the child’s work: The law requires samples of the student’s work. A simple way to keep these would be to periodically insert samples of work into a pocket divider in a three ring binder that also holds the daily log of hours, diary, and record of evaluations. Each divider could house two- four subjects.

• Record of evaluations: This could be done in many ways, for example: chapter tests, daily grades, professional testing, periodic reviews of progress, etc.


Additionally, the law states that a daily log would be a defense to any prosecution. A daily log is a record of hours broken into subjects, core and non-core and a tally area for of hours per day spent on core subjects. There are a variety of daily logs, choose one that is simple to use yet is accurate and clear in presenting the student’s hourly progress. View an example of a homeschool log sheet here.




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